Over-Reporting Intimate Partner Violence in Australian Survey Research

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Accepted Manuscript (AM)

Author(s)
Ackerman, Jeffrey
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2016
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

This research, inspired by the cognitive interviewing literature, investigates misreporting of intimate partner violence when survey participants interpret items in unintended ways. In over 23 per cent of victimizations reported by university-aged males and in over 12 per cent of victimizations reported by females, follow-up questions revealed that purported violence was either accidental or done in a manner where neither partner took the event seriously. The problem was worse for perpetration reports where over 47 per cent of male reports and over 17 per cent of female reports were endorsed in a manner unintended by instrument design. The magnitude of the problem, together with its gendered nature, suggests that misreporting of this type is a substantial problem having the potential to negatively affect the testing of partner-violence theories.

Journal Title

British Journal of Criminology

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

56

Issue

4

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2016 Oxford University Press. This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Criminology following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Over-Reporting Intimate Partner Violence in Australian Survey Research, British Journal of Criminology, Volume 56, Issue 4, 1 July 2016 is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azv066

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

International and comparative law

Criminology

Criminological theories

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections