Town Scheming: The Kenbi Aboriginal Land Claim and the Role of Planning in Securing Possession

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Jackson, Sue
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2022
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Abstract

This article provides a detailed history of Australia’s longest running Indigenous land claim (1978–2016), made by the Larrakia traditional owners to the coastal hinterland of Darwin, under Australia’s first land rights legislation. It reveals the efforts of the state and its planners to exercise territorial control and establish a racialised socio-political order through planning legislation and land use plans. Institutions designed to return land to Indigenous peoples represent a critical site of inquiry for understanding not only how injustice is reproduced and resisted in settler colonial contexts but how settler colonial urbanism is made and remade as imperial power.

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Journal of Planning History

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FT130101145

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Jackson, S, Town Scheming: The Kenbi Aboriginal Land Claim and the Role of Planning in Securing Possession, Journal of Planning History, 2022. Copyright 2022 The Authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.

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This publication has been entered in Griffith Research Online as an advanced online version.

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Urban and regional planning

Historical studies

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Jackson, S, Town Scheming: The Kenbi Aboriginal Land Claim and the Role of Planning in Securing Possession, Journal of Planning History, 2022

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