Cyclic mechanical stimulation rescues achilles tendon from degeneration in a bioreactor system.

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Wang, Tao
Lin, Zhen
Ni, Ming
Thien, Christine
Day, Robert E
Gardiner, Bruce
Rubenson, Jonas
Kirk, Thomas B
Smith, David W
Wang, Allan
Lloyd, David G
Wang, Yan
Zheng, Qiujian
Zheng, Ming H
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2015
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Physiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for tendinopathy, whereby symptoms are relieved by changing the biomechanical environment of the pathological tendon. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we first established a model of progressive tendinopathy‐like degeneration in the rabbit Achilles. Following ex vivo loading deprivation culture in a bioreactor system for 6 and 12 days, tendons exhibited progressive degenerative changes, abnormal collagen type III production, increased cell apoptosis, and weakened mechanical properties. When intervention was applied at day 7 for another 6 days by using cyclic tensile mechanical stimulation (6% strain, 0.25 Hz, 8 h/day) in a bioreactor, the pathological changes and mechanical properties were almost restored to levels seen in healthy tendon. Our results indicated that a proper biomechanical environment was able to rescue early‐stage pathological changes by increased collagen type I production, decreased collagen degradation and cell apoptosis. The ex vivo model developed in this study allows systematic study on the effect of mechanical stimulation on tendon biology.

Journal Title

Journal of Orthopaedic Research

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

33

Issue

12

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Biomedical engineering

Biomedical engineering not elsewhere classified

Clinical sciences

Sports science and exercise

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections