Surviving the Crisis of Relocation for Specialist Treatment in Haematology: Insights from New Zealand

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McGrath, Pamela
Holewa, Hamish
Etcheverry, Pru
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2011
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Abstract

Patients diagnosed with haematological malignancies require specialist treatments provided by major metropolitan hospitals. Those living outside the cities where the specialist care is located have to relocate for this specialist treatment. The findings presented in this article are from a program of research that documents the psychosocial impact of relocation on patients and their families. Prior Australian-based research conducted as part of the program indicates that the process of relocation exacerbates the stress of treatment and creates significant practical, emotional, social, and financial disruption to the families involved. The Australian findings provided the basis for a recent comparative study conducted by the program that explores the experience of relocation for haematology from the perspective of patients and their carers in New Zealand. The findings from the comparative study indicate that whilst there is evidence of similar psycho-social distress associated with relocation, there are a number of factors specific to living in New Zealand that ameliorate the impact, including smaller distances, strong community connections, and the participants' personal determination to retain the focus on living.

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Illness, Crisis and Loss

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19

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3

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© 2011 Baywood Publishing. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

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Health and Community Services

Public Health and Health Services

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