Dingo-human conflict: attacks on humans

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Appleby, Rob
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2015
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Abstract

Chapter 5 reviewed conflict between graziers and dingoes, but in more recent years direct conflict has emerged between humans and dingoes. Or, at least, in more recent years stories about such conflict have begun to appear with some regularity in the media, mostly originating from Frazer Island. The management of the dingoes on Frazer Island has been highly controversial and publicised, particularly since the death of a young boy in 2001. Various stakeholders have raised concerns about aspects of the management and research of dingoes on Frazer Island. These include capture and handling procedures, the use of collars for tracking or aversive conditioning, the use of ear-tags for identification, a policy against feeding and interaction, the condition of dingoes, the use of fencing to exclude dingoes from certain human-use areas, and the lethal control of dingoes deemed to be a risk to human safety.

Several research projects have been conducted on Frazer Island in relation to dingoes and interactions with people, but most have been brief or piecemeal in nature and highly speculative when it comes to dingo behaviour. Yet it is knowledge of the latter, and perhaps of the behaviour of human participants as well, that is likely to lead to better management decisions. This chapter will review the conflict between tourists and dingoes, with a major focus on the idyllic tourism destination of Frazier Island. It concludes by suggesting ways in which humans can learn to coexist with dingoes in such places.

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The Dingo Debate: Origins, Behaviour and Conservation
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Zoology not elsewhere classified
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