Megapodes in Northern Australia: A summary of recent research on the orange-footed scrubfowl and Australian brush-turkey

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Author(s)
Jones, Darryl
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
S. J. J. F. Davies
Date
2008
Size
83866 bytes
File type(s)
application/pdf
Location
Katannind, Western Australia
License
Abstract

Malleefowl are unquestionably the aberrant megapode: all of the other 21 species live in subtropical and tropical regions, mainly in dense rainforests where the construction of incubation mounds is relatively straighforward. Malleefowl are of particular interest because they have somehow managed to adapt what would have been a life in the jungle to millennia of relentless drying. Coping with extreme climate change is possible but requires sophisticated adaptations. Comparisons with the two more northern megapodes that occur in Australia - the Australian Brush-turkey and the Orange-footed Scrubfowl - provides an assessment of the extent of this adaptation in Malleefowl as well as an opportunity to learn how the other species are faring. Although many megapodes remain seriously threatened, these two Australian species have learned how to live successfully among people, in some locations such as Brisbane, Darwin and Cairns, becoming nuisances in urban areas. Despite its abundance, however, the scrubfowl remains poorly studied. On the other hand, continuing work on the brush-turkey has greatly enhanced our understanding of the species and of many aspects that are common to the family as a whole. Of particular importance is the recent discovery of a specialised form of temperature sex determination in brush-turkeys in which different levels of mound heat result in highly skewed sex ratios. This presentation will review some of these recent findings, highlighting issues of particular relevance to Malleefowl conservation and ecology.

Journal Title
Conference Title
Katanning National Malleefowl Forum 2007: Proceedings
Book Title
Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
© The Author(s) 2008. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owner for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this conference please refer to the conference's website or contact the author.
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Persistent link to this record
Citation