Does a clinical psychology education moderate relationships between personality or emotional adjustment and performance as a clinical psychologist?

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O'Donovan, A
Dyck, MJ
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2005
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Abstract

Does an education in clinical psychology affect relationships between personality or emotional adjustment and clinical knowledge or clinical practice ability? Two groups were assessed at the beginning of their professional development and 1 year later. The 1st group was studying clinical psychology, and the 2nd group was obtaining training under a workplace supervision model. At pretest, measures of defensiveness were correlated with practice ability, and participants who had emotional adjustment problems obtained lower practice ability scores. At posttest, neither pretest personality nor emotional adjustment was correlated with clinical performance. An interaction between education group and problem group suggests that a clinical education enhances the performance of students with emotional problems at the onset of their education

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Psychotherapy: Theory, Research Practice & Training

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42

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3

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© 2005 American Psycological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Reproduced here in accordance with publisher policy. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.

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Psychology

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