Understanding children’s perspectives of classroom writing practices through drawings

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Baroutsis, Aspa
Kervin, Lisa
Woods, Annette
Comber, Barbara
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2019
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Abstract

Examining how young children learn to write is increasingly important as global society moves further towards a knowledge economy, where the production of texts of various kinds is an increasingly ubiquitous practice in everyday life and work. While there has been recent policy and practice focus on children’s writing performance in standardised tests, in this article, the authors focus on what can be learned by listening to children’s voices as they are engaged in ‘draw and talk’ methodologies. While children’s drawings have a material reality, they are also representations of children’s perceptions of their experiences with learning to write. In this article, the authors explore the processes, practices and relationships involved in learning to write, depicted in children’s drawings when they are asked to draw themselves learning to write. The authors identify representations of writing, evident in the children’s drawings focusing the relational, the material and the spatial elements of writing.

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Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood
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Aspa Baroutsis et al., Understanding children’s perspectives of classroom writing practices through drawings, Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 1–17, 2017. Copyright 2017 The Authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
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Education systems
Education systems not elsewhere classified
Political science
Cultural studies
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