Good Democratic Leadership

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Kane, John
Patapan, Haig
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
John Kane and Haig Patapan
Date
2014
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

In this introductory chapter we first reflect on the meaning and nature of modern democracy by focusing specifically on its historical amalgamation with liberalism. We then examine the notion of practical reason or judgment on the assumption that good leadership must depend crucially on a capacity for good judgment. We contrast classical conceptions of judgment with modern ones to argue that modern theorists effectively 'democratized' judgment in a way that caused its reduction to two mutually incompatible conceptions: amoral, self-interested calculation on the one side; and the application of strict moral imperatives on the other. We claim that, if good leadership is to be properly understood, we need to return to a more unified account of judgment in which interests and ethics are not necessarily opposed. We then outline five major themes this book seeks to explore, namely: the definition or meaning of good democratic leadership; the question of the education of leaders and of citizens; the conditions required to make democratic leadership effective; the importance of institutions and their influence on leadership performance; and, finally, some enduring challenges to securing good leadership in democracies.

Journal Title
Conference Title
Book Title
Good Democratic Leadership: On Prudence and Judgment in Modern Democracies
Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Self-archiving is not yet supported by this publisher. Please refer to the publisher's website or contact the author(s) for more information.
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Political Science not elsewhere classified
Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections