Development of a clinical prediction rule to identify initial responders to mobilisation with movement and exercise for lateral epicondylalgia

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Vicenzino, Bill
Smith, Dugal
Cleland, Joshua
Bisset, Leanne
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Ann Moore, Gwendolen A Jull

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2009
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Abstract

The aim of this post hoc analysis was to develop a preliminary clinical prediction rule (CPR) for identifying patients with lateral epicondylalgia (LE) likely to respond to mobilisation with movement and exercise (PT). Currently practitioners do not have an evidence-based means to identify such patients a priori. Potential predictive factors were recorded at baseline and reference measures at 3 weeks after treatment was initiated. Participants (n 젶4) received standardised PT. After 3 weeks, participants were categorised as having experienced 'improvement' or 'no improvement' with treatment. Factors with univariate relationship (p < 0.15) to 'improvement' were entered into a step-wise logistic regression model. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to calculate cut-off points for continuous variables. Analyses resulted in a CPR that included: age (<49 years,  젲.6) as well as pain free grip strength on the affected (>112 N,  젲.3) and unaffected side (<336 N,  젲.1). Probability of improvement rose from 79 to 100% if all three were positive. The CPR did not predict outcome for wait and see (n 젵7), indicating it was more accurate for PT. This post hoc analysis has created a Level IV CPR that with further validation will help practitioners identify responders. Future studies are required to validate the rule.

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Manual Therapy

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14

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5

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© 2009 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

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Clinical sciences

Sports science and exercise

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