Factors affecting audience perceptions of agency in human computer musical partnerships

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Brown, Andrew R
Gifford, Toby
Voltz, Bradley
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Furguson, Sam & Miwa, Kazuhisa

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2013
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Univ Technol, Sydney, AUSTRALIA

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Abstract

What design factors contribute to an illusion of agency in a computational system? Our previous research [1, 2] has investigated this question in the context of creative human- machine musical partnerships, where we identified musical behaviours implying machine agency from the perspective of a human performer. This paper investigates an audience perspective: what factors contribute to an impression of machine agency for in a musical performance? Audience feedback data was collected during a concert with four performances, each comprising a human musician interacting with a computer music system. Three performances utilized a computational agent, CIM [1], designed for this research. The fourth performance utilized an array of effect pedals designed in an extended instrument paradigm [3]. The audience feedback questionnaire queried whether a sense of machine agency was imparted, and to what degree visual, spatial, timbral and musical factors contributed to this impression. The results showed our CIM system succeeded in imparting a sense of agency, and that all four of the suggested factors contributed to that impression.

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C&C'13: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 9TH ACM CONFERENCE ON CREATIVITY & COGNITION 2013

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© ACM, 2013. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the 9th ACM Conference on Creativity & Cognition , ISBN: 978-1-4503-2150-1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1145/2466627.2466661

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Music performance

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