Degrees of Peripherality in the Production and Consumption of Leisure Tourism in Greenland

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Weaver, David B
Lawton, Laura J
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Lee, YS

Weaver, DB

Prebensen, NK

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2017
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Abstract

Even by the exotic standards of the Arctic as a region, Greenland (or Kalaallit Nunaat) stands out for its impressive idiosyncrasies. Under-stated by Kaae (2006: 110) as 'an emerging destination in extreme cold water', Greenland has the lowest population density of any of the world's self-governing geopolitical entities1 with 0.026 persons per km2 or 38km2 per person. More than 80% of the Danish dependency's land area of 2,166,000 km2, constituting the world's largest island, is covered by icecap, and no roads connect any of the 77 fjord-hugging towns and villages that accommodate the 57,000 mostly indigenous residents (Kaae, 2006). The patterns of leisure tourism production and consumption fostered by such isolation are described and analysed in this chapter. Subsequently, we propose that the attendant gradations of spatial and temporal peripherality give rise to four distinct zones of leisure tourist experience. A resultant inductive model of Greenland experiential leisure tourism space, amenable to follow-up empirical research, is presented as an innovative and useful alternative framework for pursuing the sustainable management1 product development and marketing of leisure tourism in Greenland as well as in extreme peripheral contexts more generally.

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Arctic Tourism Experiences: Production, Consumption and Sustainability

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Tourism management

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