Beyond the Bush Doctrine: American Hegemony and World Order

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Version of Record (VoR)

Author(s)
Griffiths, Martin
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)

Jan Pilditch, Tom Dunning

Date
2004
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

This article elaborates the changing nature of American hegemony in international relations, and assesses the Bush Administration's determination to change the basis of US hegemony in the context of its proclaimed 'war on terror'. I argue that the Administration's grand strategy is self-defeating, threatening the status of the United States as a benign hegemon without enhancing its security. However, on the assumption that the neo-conservative influence over American foreign policy will wane in the coming months and years, the United States can still take advantage of its unprecedented power to promote a more sustainable world order. The paper begins with an examination of American hegemony in international relations. I then discuss the manner in which the terms of that hegemony have been changed by the current Administration under the guise of the war on terror. The third section is a critical analysis of American grand strategy, and the article concludes with an assessment of the conditions under which the United States can sustain its dwindling hegemony in the years to come.

Journal Title

Australasian Journal of American Studies

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

23

Issue

1

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2004 Association for Canadian Studies in Australia and New Zealand. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Law

Literary Studies

Historical Studies

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections