Localism and neighbourhood planning in Australian public policy and governance

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Accepted Manuscript (AM)

Author(s)
Burton, Paul
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2017
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Localism is often used in confusing and contradictory ways in Australian political debate and policy discourse. While many State and Territory governments extol the virtues of devolving responsibility for planning and service delivery down to local governments, they show no sign of relinquishing their constitutional authority over local government or of pressing for further devolution to more localised communities. State and Territory governments continue to exercise their constitutional authority over local government in regulating their powers, responsibilities and finances and most symbolically in enforcing the amalgamation of local councils in the name of efficiency and effectiveness, often in the face of staunch opposition from the councils concerned (Brown and Bellamy, 2006; Kembray, 2015; Sansom, 2015). While this may frame localism as the application of the subsidiarity principle in practice, it reflects also an increasingly complex system of multi-level governance based on a distinctive Australian system of federalism. This system does not yet give any constitutional recognition to local government but provokes considerable debate about overlapping responsibilities, bureaucratic duplication and cost-shifting. Because most local governments in Australia cover relatively small populations, there is little or no political pressure for them to devolve powers and responsibilities to even more local levels, but this is not to say that they are not increasingly conscious of their statutory obligations and political commitments to develop more extensive and effective programs of public participation and community engagement.

Journal Title
Conference Title
Book Title

Localism and Neighbourhood Planning: Power to the People?

Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2017 Policy Press. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an chapter published in Localism and Neighbourhood Planning: Power to the People?. Details of the definitive published version and how to purchase it are available online at: https://policypress.co.uk/localism-and-neighbourhood-planning

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Community planning

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections