The Protective Influence of Family Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, and Ethnic Engagement for New Zealand Maori Adolescents

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Stuart, Jaimee
Jose, Paul E
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2014
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

The present study examined the associations among family connectedness, ethnic identity, and ethnic engagement on changes in well-being over time for the understudied population of Ma̅ori (indigenous New Zealand) youth. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal study of youth connectedness in New Zealand using self-report measures at 3 measurement occasions separated by 1 year each. Participants in the current study were 431 self-identified Ma̅ori (ages 10–15 years at Time 1). As expected, the variables of family connectedness, ethnic identity, and well-being were all positively related to each other. Results of a latent growth curve model showed that, following normative trends for adolescents of this age, well-being diminished over time for Ma̅ori youth; however, high levels of family connectedness were found to mitigate this general decline in well-being over time. Furthermore, in a longitudinal path analysis, ethnic engagement was found to exert a positive indirect effect on residualized Time 3 well-being through Time 2 ethnic identity. These findings indicate that the quality of family relationships and affiliation with one’s ethnic group are important predictors of positive adjustment for Ma̅ori youth over time. These results are discussed in the context of positive youth development for ethnic minority and indigenous youth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Journal Title

Developmental Psychology

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

50

Issue

6

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Specialist studies in education

Cognitive and computational psychology

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections