Patterns of Response and Remission Following a One-Session Treatment for Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia in Youth

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Oar, Ella L
Farrell, Lara J
Conlon, Elizabeth G
Waters, Allison M
Ollendick, Thomas H
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2017
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Abstract

Blood-Injection-Injury (BII) Phobia is a severe and impairing disorder that has been understudied in youth. The present study aimed to define patterns of response and remission following a modified One-Session Treatment (OST) including an e-therapy maintenance program for children and adolescents with BII Phobia. Moreover, characteristics of different responder groups were examined in order to determine correlates of a poorer response. Youth (n = 20; 8–18 years) were categorized into four responder groups (e.g., immediate remitter, delayed remitter, partial responder, and nonresponder) based upon defined criteria for remission. Immediate remitters to treatment were more likely to have a primary diagnosis of injection phobia, rather than a combined blood and injection phobia. Nonresponders reported significantly greater disgust sensitivity at pretreatment and were more likely to have a comorbid diagnosis of Social Phobia. In regards to within session change, youth who achieved the exposure goal of having a blood test during treatment had a significantly stronger treatment response. These preliminary findings may assist clinicians in the planning and delivering of intensive Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT) approaches for BII Phobia in youth.

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Child & Family Behavior Theory

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39

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1

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Psychology

Other psychology not elsewhere classified

Applied and developmental psychology

Clinical and health psychology

Social and personality psychology

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