Unexpected turbulence in aeromobilities

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Barry, Kaya
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Barry, Kaya
Borovnik, Maria
Edensor, Timothy
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2020
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Abstract

Air travel is dependent on transport infrastructures, stratospheric conditions, weather events, seasonal temporalities, and other planetary systems that the aircraft, and its passengers, are navigated through. Turbulence in air travel is a common weather phenomenon where the aircraft encounters differences in air pressures, temperatures, or jet streams. Climate change predictions indicate that turbulence will increase over the next decades from the likelihood of more extreme weather events, increases in storm activity worldwide, and disruptions to jet streams. For passengers aboard aircrafts, turbulence is a moment of disruption and unsettling of the usually smooth and sleek ideals of air travel. This chapter explores turbulence as a weather phenomenon that may attune air travellers to larger sensations of changing weather mobilities. Drawing on creative documentation from on-the-ground and in-the-air during a severe tropical low-pressure system ‘weather event’ in Australia, the chapter explores how the disruptive and confronting sensations might bring to the foreground the entanglements and impacts of increasing human mobility on larger-scale weather and planetary changes.

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Weather: Spaces, Mobilities and Affects
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Cultural geography
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Barry, K, Unexpected turbulence in aeromobilities, Weather: Spaces, Mobilities and Affects, 2020
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