Soil and Tree Physiological Responses to Mulch and Weed Control in Hardwood Plantations

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Primary Supervisor

Xu, Zhihong

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Bubb, Ken

Blumfield, Tim

Chen, Chengrong

Boyd, Sue

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Date
2008
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Abstract

The land available for new hardwood plantations in southeast Queensland, Australia characteristically has low soil moisture availability and fertility. Establishment silviculture, such as mulch and weed control, is being used to overcome soil nutrient and water limitations during the establishment phase of hardwood plantations. However, the soil and tree physiological responses to mulch and weed control can vary widely since specific responses to such treatments in any particular stand will be the result of complex interactions of site condition, tree species, and climate. Spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. Variegata (F. Muell.)) and blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis Smith) are currently recommended for plantation development because they have good wood quality, good market potential and are expected to grow well on a range of sites in south-east Queensland. In this study, a series of closely related field experiments have been conducted to evaluate the effects of mulch and weed control on soil and tree physiological properties in the two establishing hardwood plantations.

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Thesis (PhD Doctorate)

Degree Program

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

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Griffith School of Environment

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The author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.

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Public

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Subject

Hardwood plantations Queensland

Soil conditions

Mulch

Weed control

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