Examination of emotional priming among children and young adolescents: Developmental issues and its association with anxiety

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Spence, Susan H
Lipp, Ottmar V
Liberman, Lisa
March, Sonja
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2006
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

An affective priming task was used to examine bias in the processing of threat-related material in 25 clinically anxious compared to 25 matched, non-anxious control children and young adolescents. No significant differences were found between anxious and non-anxious children in terms of priming effects. However, age-related differences were found depending upon the valence of the target, independent of anxiety status. Both younger (7 - 10 years) and older (11 - 14 years) children showed faster response times to pleasant targets when they were preceded by a congruent compared to incongruent stimulus, consistent with a traditional priming effect. For threat target stimuli, older children showed no difference in response latency according to the congruency of the prime-target valence. Younger children, in contrast, showed a reverse priming effect for threat target stimuli, with slower response times for threat-congruent trials than for threat targets preceded by a pleasant prime. Possible explanations for developmental differences in the processing of threat-related material are discussed.

Journal Title

Australian Journal of Psychology

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

58

Issue

2

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Cognitive and computational psychology

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections