Increased reactions to pediatric influenza vaccination following concomitant pneumococcal vaccination

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Van Buynder, Paul G
Frosst, Gillian
Van Buynder, Jan L
Tremblay, Francios-William
Ross, Alie
Jardine, Claire
Fei, Bao Gang
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2013
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Abstract

Background: Influenza in children causes significant morbidity and hospitalizations and also some mortality particularly in children <5 years of age. Influenza vaccination in children has been shown to be safe and effective, but in 2010 the pediatric influenza vaccination program was suspended in Western Australia after the rate of febrile convulsions observed (9/1000 doses) was 55 times the previously reported rate.

In 2009, over 80% of all children in New Brunswick were vaccinated with an adjuvanted monovalent H1N1 vaccine shown to have very high effectiveness, raising the prospect of potential hyper‐responsiveness because of residual protection. We conducted enhanced post‐marketing surveillance to monitor local and general reactions.

Methods: Parents of participating children seen at dedicated vaccination clinics were given influenza vaccine survey kits to record local and general symptoms up to 3 days following receipt of season influenza vaccine.

Results: Febrile reactions of ≥38° occurred in <10% of children who received a first dose of seasonal influenza vaccine (n = 660) and severe febrile incidents with fever ≥39° were uncommon. Concurrent administration of other vaccine(s) including conjugated pneumococcal vaccine appeared to increase reactogenicity. No child in the study had a febrile convulsion.

Conclusion: Influenza vaccines in children are safe, and this study provides a baseline for rapid assessment studies at the start of a vaccine season. Parents should be aware of increased fevers with concurrent vaccine administration, and antipyretics should be considered.

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Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses

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7

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2

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Clinical sciences

Epidemiology not elsewhere classified

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