Does power indicate capacity? 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test vs. Maximal accumulated O2 deficit

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Minahan, C
Chia, M
Inbar, O
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2007
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between anaerobic power and capacity. Seven men and seven women performed a 30-s Wingate Anaerobic Test on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power, mean power, and the fatigue index. Subjects also cycled at a work rate predicted to elicit 120 % of peak oxygen uptake to exhaustion to determine the maximal accumulated O2 deficit. Peak power and the maximal accumulated O2 deficit were significantly correlated (r = 0.782, p = 0.001). However, when the absolute difference in exercise values between groups (men and women) was held constant using a partial correlation, the relationship diminished (r = 0.531, p = 0.062). In contrast, we observed a significant correlation between fatigue index and the maximal accumulated O2 deficit when controlling for gender (r = - 0.597, p = 0.024) and the relationship remained significant when values were expressed relative to active muscle mass. A higher anaerobic power does not indicate a greater anaerobic capacity. Furthermore, we suggest that the ability to maintain power output during a 30-s cycle sprint is related to anaerobic capacity.

Journal Title

International Journal of Sports Medicine

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

28

Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Mechanical engineering

Sports science and exercise

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections