Constitutional Narratives: Constitutional Adjudication on the Religion Clauses in Australia and Malaysia

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Evans, Carolyn M
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2009
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Constitutions are, in part, a story that a country tells about itself.1 It tells the world that a country is: democratic and rights respecting;2 revolutionary and radical;3 religious and righteous;4 traditionalist and lawyerly. Yet the story is not static and, in most cases, there is not a single story about the broader place and purpose of the constitution. There may be a dominant story at a particular point in time, but there are usually other stories that contest that dominance and, particularly at times of constitutional controversy, may lead to the rise of a new dominant narrative.

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Emory International Law Review

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23

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2

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© The Authors (2009), Emory International Law Review, Vol. 23 (2), pp. 437-467, 2009. After all reasonable attempts to contact the copyright owner, this work was published in good faith in interests of the digital preservation of academic scholarship. Please contact copyright@griffith.edu.au with any questions or concerns.

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Law

constitutional law

constitutional narrative

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Evans, CM, Constitutional Narratives: Constitutional Adjudication on the Religion Clauses in Australia and Malaysia, Emory International Law Review, 2009, 23 (2), pp. 437-467

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