US leadership and Asia's liberal order: Current and future challenges for regional allies and partners

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Heazle, M
O'Neil, A
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)

Heazle, Michael

O’Neil, Andrew

Date
2018
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

US primacy has provided not only the political foundation of America’s many long-standing relationships in the region, but also the foundation of the regional order’s most fundamental norms and aspirations, in addition to the public goods needed for their pursuit. But the regional environment is now facing transformation in the face of both China’s ongoing challenge to the existing political order and the prospect of a US no longer willing to unilaterally guarantee regional security now, or perhaps in the future either. US allies and partners in Asia committed to a ‘rules-based’ liberal order, then, increasingly need to recalibrate their expectations of the US, but also to do more in asserting the authority of the order’s principles and rules in ways that continue to support US leadership but still recognize the current, and likely future, limits imposed by America’s status as a non-resident power in the region.

Journal Title
Conference Title
Book Title

China's Rise and Australia-Japan-US Relations: Primacy and Leadership in East Asia

Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Commerce, management, tourism and services

Political science

Persistent link to this record
Citation

Heazle, M; O'Neil, A, US leadership and Asia's liberal order: Current and future challenges for regional allies and partners, China's Rise and Australia-Japan-US Relations: Primacy and Leadership in East Asia, 2018, pp. 241-250

Collections