The Art of the New Queen Elizabeth II Courts of Law: Art in the Public Sphere

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Younger, Jay
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John McKenna QC & Helen Jeffcoat

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2013
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The story of art in courthouses in Queensland began many years ago with the advent of Queensland’s first public art policy, Art Built-in. Justice and Attorney-General embraced commissioning public art to assist in humanising its courthouses. In previous times civic buildings and the accompanying public art was often intimidating and austere. JAG has become one of the State’s most sophisticated commissioners of public art where art has become central to breaking down the alienating and bureaucratic impressions that accompany the administration of justice. The new Queen Elizabeth II Courts of Law is the principal civic landmark building in the heart of Brisbane’s legal precinct. Accordingly it was always envisaged that the building be consistent with the status and respect vested in the judicial system within Queensland. From the outset the intention for the new Queen Elizabeth II Courts of Law, as one of the State’s most important expressions of democracy, was to express its public transparency in the built form.

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Queensland Legal Yearbook 2012

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2013

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Visual Cultures

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