Educational Characteristics of Students with High or Low Self-concept

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Hay, Ian
Ashman, A.
Van Kraanyenoord, C.
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1998
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Abstract

In response to methodological concerns associated with previous research into the educational characteristics of students with high or low self‐concept, the topic was re‐examined using a significantly more representative sample and a contemporary self‐concept measure. From an initial screening of 515 preadolescent, coeducational students in 18 schools, students significantly high or low in self‐concept were compared using standardized tests in reading, spelling, and mathematics, and teacher interviews to determine students' academic and nonacademic characteristics. The teachers were not informed of the self‐concept status of the students. Compared to students with low self‐concept, students with high self‐concept were rated by teachers as being more popular, cooperative, and persistent in class, showed greater leadership, were lower in anxiety, had more supportive families, and had higher teacher expectations for their future success. Teachers observed that students with low self‐concept were quiet and withdrawn, while peers with high self‐concept were talkative and more dominating with peers. Students with lower self‐concepts were also lower than their peers in reading, spelling, and mathematical abilities. The findings support the notion that there is an interactive relationship between self‐concept and achievement.

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Psychology in the Schools
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Specialist Studies in Education
Psychology
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