The Gold Coast as a city of 'Adolescent Urbanism'

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Accepted Manuscript (AM)

Author(s)
Burton, P
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2016
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Australia's oldest cities are little more than two hundred years old. Some are much younger, emerging only recently and growing rapidly. In the space of little more than one generation the City of Gold Coast has become Australia's sixth largest city, having only come into existence as a local government entity in 1959. The pace and extent of this growth is seen by some as exemplary and as a model for other emergent Australian cities, and by others as the epitome of unregulated and unsustainable urban growth. This paper analyzes the nature, extent and pace of urban growth in the City of Gold Coast using a framework derived from theories of human development. It treats the city as a case of 'adolescent urbanism' in which rapid physical growth is accompanied by identity confusion, hubris and egocentricity, entrepreneurial zeal and emergent forward thinking. The paper goes on to consider briefly possible future trajectories of the city – in particular, its prospects for growing up and becoming a more mature city as well as the risks (or opportunities) associated with remaining an adolescent city. The paper concludes by reflecting critically on the potential for applying this developmental conception of urban growth in the City of Gold Coast to other Australian cities.

Journal Title

Built Environment

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

42

Issue

1

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2016 Alexandrine Press. This is the preprint version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Architecture

Urban and regional planning

History and theory of the built environment (excl. architecture)

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections