Heat exposure and farmers' health in Vietnam: Impacts and health promotion strategies

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Files

Tran_Nu Quy Linh_Final Thesis_Redacted.pdf (16.76 MB)

File version
Primary Supervisor
Chu, Cordia M
Other Supervisors
Phung, Dung T
Anh Luong, Mai
Nghiem, Son H
Phung, Hai N
Editor(s)
Date
2024-02-29
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Increasing extremes of temperature is becoming a global public health threat. Exposure to high temperatures can result in heat-related illnesses (HRI), exacerbate existing chronic conditions, and increase the risk of hospitalisation and mortality. Agricultural workers, especially in developing countries, face heightened exposure risk due to prolonged outdoor exposure and insufficient protection. In Vietnam, a country where over one-third of its workforce engaged in farming and 90% of farmers relied on traditional manual farming methods, the heat-related health risks are even higher. Although agriculture is vital to the economy and food security, Vietnamese farmers lack protections from occupational health and safety (OHS) regulations and have limited access to health and social services. This PhD project aimed to evaluate the health effects of high-temperature exposure on Vietnamese farmers and developed health promotion strategies. The project included four studies that were connected and mutually supportive of each other. The first study conducted a global systematic review synthesising existing research on heat impacts on agricultural workers' health. The second involved a time-series analysis to examine the temperature-hospitalisation association of farmers in six Vietnamese provinces. The third study was a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of HRI symptoms and associated factors. Lastly, the fourth study implemented a community needs assessment (CNA) to explore different perspectives on heat exposure, heat-prevention difficulties, and prioritised solutions. These four studies were guided by a multiconceptual framework combining the Concept of Vulnerability, the Socioecological Model, the CNA framework, and the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Together, these frameworks provided a comprehensive and context-sensitive approach to understanding the complex heat-health relationship. [...]

Journal Title
Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Thesis (PhD Doctorate)
Degree Program
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
School
School of Medicine & Dentistry
Publisher link
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
The author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
climate change
Vietnam
heat-related illness
farmers
Persistent link to this record
Citation