Healthcare professionals’ hand hygiene knowledge and beliefs in the United Arab Emirates

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Ng, WK
Shaban, RZ
van de Mortel, T
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2017
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Abstract

Background: Hand hygiene at key moments during patient care is considered an important infection prevention and control measure to reduce healthcare-associated infections. While there is extensive research in Western settings, there is little in the United Arab Emirates where particular cultural and religious customs are thought to influence hand hygiene behaviour.

Aim: To examine the hand hygiene knowledge and beliefs of health professionals at a tertiary care hospital in the United Arab Emirates.

Methods: A mixed methods design employed a survey followed by focus groups with nurses and doctors.

Findings: A total of 109 participants (13.6%) completed the survey: 96 nurses (88%) and 13 doctors (12%). Doctors’ hand hygiene knowledge was slightly higher than that of nurses (78.5% versus 73.5%). There was no significant difference in scores on the hand hygiene beliefs scale between nurses (M = 103.06; SD = 8.0) and doctors (M = 99.00; SD = 10.53; t (80) = 1.55; p = 0.13, two-tailed). Seven categories emerged following transcript analysis.

Discussion: Hand hygiene knowledge scores suggest further hand hygiene education is required, especially on alcohol-based hand rub use. Addressing doctors’ beliefs is particularly important given the leadership roles that doctors play in healthcare settings.

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Journal of Infection Prevention

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18

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3

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Clinical sciences not elsewhere classified

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