Does Low Self-Control Predict Fictitious Drug Use and Untruthfulness?

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Meldrum, Ryan C
Piquero, Alex R
Clark, Jim
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2013
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This study tests Hirschi and Gottfredson's (1993) argument that self-control is related to survey response patterns. It is hypothesized that individuals who are low in self-control will be less likely to provide honest answers in survey research, a critical but untested question with respect to the general theory. Data from approximately 1,600 high school students in a Southeastern U.S. state are used to examine the relationship between low self-control and self-reported indicators of fictitious drug use and honesty when completing a survey questionnaire dealing with deviant behavior. Findings indicate that low self-control is significantly related to reports of having used a fictitious drug and having been untruthful when completing a survey questionnaire, suggesting that the reliability of survey research may depend on individual traits such as low self-control.

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Deviant Behavior

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34

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3

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Causes and prevention of crime

Sociology

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