Unique structural features of a bacterial autotransporter adhesin suggest mechanisms for interaction with host macromolecules

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Paxman, Jason J
Lo, Alvin W
Sullivan, Matthew J
Panjikar, Santosh
Kuiper, Michael
Whitten, Andrew E
Wang, Geqing
Luan, Chi-Hao
Moriel, Danilo G
Tan, Lendl
Peters, Kate M
Minh-Duy, Phan
Gee, Christine L
Ulett, Glen C
Schembri, Mark A
Heras, Begona
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2019
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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Abstract

Autotransporters are the largest family of outer membrane and secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. Most autotransporters are localised to the bacterial surface where they promote colonisation of host epithelial surfaces. Here we present the crystal structure of UpaB, an autotransporter that is known to contribute to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) colonisation of the urinary tract. We provide evidence that UpaB can interact with glycosaminoglycans and host fibronectin. Unique modifications to its core β-helical structure create a groove on one side of the protein for interaction with glycosaminoglycans, while the opposite face can bind fibronectin. Our findings reveal far greater diversity in the autotransporter β-helix than previously thought, and suggest that this domain can interact with host macromolecules. The relevance of these interactions during infection remains unclear.

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NATURE COMMUNICATIONS
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10
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© The Author(s) 2019 Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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Biochemistry and cell biology
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