A comparison of constructed and natural habitat for frog conservation in an Australian agricultural landscape.

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Hazell, D
Hero, JM
Lindenmayer, D
Cunningham, R
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R Marrs (Editor-in-Chief)
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2004
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Abstract

Constructed ponds are an important consideration in the conservation of wetland biota in agricultural landscapes. Twenty-two natural ponds and 22 adjacent constructed ponds (farm dams) were surveyed on the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales to compare patterns of use by frogs and develop frog conservation recommendations. Farm dams supported similar numbers of frog species to natural ponds, although differences in frog assemblage were observed between the pond types. Limnodynastes tasmaniensis and Uperolia laevigata were significantly more likely to occur at farm dams while L. peronii was more likely to occur at natural ponds. Results suggest waterbodies with high levels of emergent vegetation cover that lack fish are likely to support a high number of frog species, regardless of origin (i.e. natural or constructed). However, it is important for landholders to conserve natural waterbodies as these environments appear likely to support frog species that do not use farm dams.

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Biological Conservation
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119
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Environmental sciences
Biological sciences
Agricultural, veterinary and food sciences
History, heritage and archaeology
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