Bilharzia in the Philippines: past, present, and future

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Author(s)
Olveda, David U
Li, Yuesheng
Olveda, Remigio M
Lam, Alfred K
McManus, Donald P
Chau, Thao NP
Harn, Donald A
Williams, Gail M
Gray, Darren J
Ross, Allen GP
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2014
Size

851963 bytes

File type(s)

application/pdf

Location
Abstract

Schistosomiasis japonica has a long history in the Philippines. In 1975, 24 endemic provinces were identified in the northern, central, and southern islands of the Philippines. More than five million people were at risk, with approximately one million infected. In 2003, new foci of infection were found in two provinces in the north and central areas. For the past 30 years, human mass drug administration (MDA), utilizing the drug praziquantel, has been the mainstay of control in the country. Recent studies have shown that the schistosomiasis prevalence ranges from 1% to 50% within different endemic zones. Severe end-organ morbidity is still present in many endemic areas, particularly in remote villages with poor treatment coverage. Moreover, subtle morbidities such as growth retardation, malnutrition, anemia, and poor cognitive function in infected children persist. There is now strong evidence that large mammals (e.g. water buffaloes, cattle) contribute significantly to disease transmission, complicating control efforts. Given the zoonotic nature of schistosomiasis in the Philippines, it is evident that the incidence, prevalence, and morbidity of the disease will not be controlled by MDA alone. There is a need for innovative cost-effective strategies to control schistosomiasis in the long term.

Journal Title

International Journal of Infectious Diseases

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

18

Issue

1

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© The Author(s) 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of International Society for Infectious Diseases. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited. If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under a licence identical to this one.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Microbiology

Medical microbiology

Clinical sciences

Epidemiology

Public health

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections