Repetitive Negative Thinking in Social Anxiety Disorder 1: Anticipatory Processing

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Sluis, Rachel
Boschen, Mark
Neumann, David
Murphy, Karen
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2017
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Abstract

Cognitive models of social anxiety disorder (SAD) emphasize anticipatory processing as a prominent maintaining factor that occurs before social-evaluative events. Anticipatory processing occurs when a socially anxious individual is expecting a social event and can be described as a mode of repetitive negative thinking dominated by past failures, negative images of oneself, predictions of poor performance and rejection. The present review examined the literature on anticipatory processing in social anxiety in an effort to highlight important findings pertaining to this construct. Correlational and experimental studies have investigated the relationship between anticipatory processing and the behavioural, physiological, cognitive and affective outcomes for socially anxious individuals. Studies investigating the characteristics, causes, and consequences of anticipatory processing according to models of social anxiety were included for review. The majority of study designs include those investigating anticipatory processing prior to social-evaluative threat. Directions for future research are discussed and an overview of a framework for explaining anticipatory processing biases in social anxiety is presented.

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Psychopathology Review

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4

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3

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© 2017 Textrum. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

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Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology

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