Confidence and Trust in Public Institution Natural Hazards Management: Case Studies in Urban and Rural China

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Lo, AY
Cheung, LTO
Lee, AKY
Xu, B
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2016
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Abstract

This research aims to investigate the extent to which urban and rural residents trust grassroots-level institutions and how this might affect community resilience to environmental change in China. It focuses on the commitments of institutional actors and their capacities to manage natural hazards and coordinate the community's response. Semistructured interviews were conducted with megacity (Tianjin) and remote village (Wolong) residents in China. We found that public confidence in grassroots-level institutions is limited due to inherent constraints on resources and power. Residents of Wolong tend to recognize the commitment and role of those institutions in connecting individuals with one another, whereas their urban counterparts in Tianjin remain skeptical. Issues of solidarity might account for this difference. These findings will have implications for state–society cooperation and disaster risk comanagement in both urban and rural China.

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The Professional Geographer

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68

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3

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Physical geography and environmental geoscience

Physical geography and environmental geoscience not elsewhere classified

Human geography

China

Hazards management

Institutional trust

Natural hazards

Public confidence

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