Indigenous Contexts in the Law Curriculum: Process and Structure

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Galloway, Kathrine
Griffith University Author(s)
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2018
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Abstract

The role of the law in the dispossession and oppression of Indigenous peoples world-wide is not a new idea. In Australia, in particular since the rise of critical race studies1 in the academy and the momentum of the reconciliation movement in wider Australian society,2 legal scholars have increasingly engaged in critical inquiry into diverse areas of law, brought together under the subject field that might be described as Indigenous Australians and the law. 3 Additionally, law schools have in the past decade or so apparently attempted to design and deliver curricula that engage with Indigenous Australians’4 experiences before the law, though with varying degrees of success.5 The challenge for the academy of incorporating Indigenous contexts into the law curriculum remains

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Legal Education Review

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28

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2

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© 2018 The Author(s) & Legal Education Review. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited.

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the law

Legal education

Law in context

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Galloway, K, Indigenous Contexts in the Law Curriculum: Process and Structure, Legal Education Review, 2018, 28 (2)

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