The Impact of Indigenous Status on Adult Sentencing: A Review of the Statistical Research Literature From the United States, Canada, and Australia

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Jeffries, Samantha
E. W. Bond, Christine
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2012
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

The gross overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in prison populations suggests that sentencing may be a discriminatory process. Using findings from recent (1991-2011) multivariate statistical sentencing analyses from the United States, Canada, and Australia, we review the 3 key hypotheses advanced as plausible explanations for baseline sentencing discrepancies between Indigenous and non-Indigenous adult criminal defendants: (a) differential involvement, (b) negative discrimination, and (c) positive discrimination. Overall, the prior research shows strong support for the differential involvement thesis and some support for the discrimination theses (positive and negative). We argue that where discrimination is found, it may be explained by the lack of a more complete set of control variables in researchers' multivariate models and/or differing political and social contexts.

Journal Title
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice
Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
10
Issue
3
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Criminology
Courts and sentencing
Legal systems
Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections