Altered Adhesion, Proliferation and death in neural cultures from adults with schizophrenia

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Feron, F
Perry, C
Hirning, MH
McGrath, J
Mackay-Sim, A
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
1999
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

The causes of schizophrenia are unknown, but there is evidence linking subtle deviations in neural development with schizophrenia. Embryonic brain development cannot be studied in an adult with schizophrenia, but neurogenesis and early events in neuronal differentiation can be investigated throughout adult life in the human olfactory epithelium. Our past research has demonstrated that neuronal cultures can be derived from biopsy of the human adult olfactory epithelium. In the present study, we examined mechanisms related to neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation in adults with schizophrenia versus well controls. Forty biopsies were collected under local anaesthesia from ten individuals with DSM III-R schizophrenia and ten age- and sex-matched well controls. All patients, except one, were receiving antipsychotic medication at the time of the biopsy. Immunostaining for neuronal markers indicated that neurogenesis occurred in the biopsies from both patients and controls since all contained cells expressing tubulin and/or olfactory marker protein. The major findings of this study are: 1.biopsies from patients with schizophrenia showed a significantly reduced ability to attach to the culture slide: 29.9% of patient biopsies attached compared to 73.5% of control biopsies; 2.biopsies from patients with schizophrenia had a significantly greater proportion of cells undergoing mitosis: 0.69% in the patients compared to 0.29% in the controls; and 3.dopamine (10卩 significantly increased the proportion of apoptotic cells in the control cultures but significantly decreased the proportion in patients' cultures.

Journal Title
Schizophrenia Research
Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
40
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject
Biomedical and clinical sciences
Psychology
Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections