The Prediction and Prevention of Violence in Pubs and Clubs

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Homel, Ross
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1995
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Abstract

Although there is much research that suggests that alcohol is a causal factor in criminal violence, relatively little is known about the situational factors and management practices that increase the risk o f violence in and around licensed premises.The aim of the present study was to use quantitative methods to clarify the situational and management factors most predictive of violence, and, in particular, to examine the role of intoxication.Visits(N=147) of two hours duration were madeto45siteswithin 36premises in Sydney, AUS in the winter of1991. A totalof102 incidents of aggression were observed,29 (28.4%)involving physical violence. These incidents were concentrated in a small number of premises.A major predictor of physical violence was staff intervention with intoxicated patrons, particularly, refusal of service. Male drunkenness and "drinks in rounds" shouting predicted non-physical aggression more strongly than physical violence,controlling for staff intervention.Prevention strategies should include serious enforcement of legislation prohibiting the sale of alcohol to intoxicated persons, and the use of responsible serving practices in all licensed premises,not just high-risk establishments.Experience from a community intervention program in southeast Queensland highlights the value of a local code of practice for licensed premises,supported by a monitoring committee to encourage: responsible serving and pricing practices; better quality entertainment; and the training of bouncers, bar staff and management in non-violent crowd control techniques.

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Crime Prevention Studies

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3

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© 1995 Criminal Justice Press. Reproduced here in accordance with publisher policy. Please refer to the book link for access to the definitive, published version.

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Medical and Health Sciences

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