Overcoming barriers to best practice interviewing

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Powell, Martine
Steinberg, Rebecca
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2012
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Abstract

While there are factors affecting the quality of an investigative interview with a child that are out of the interviewer’s control, research shows that one of the major determinants of interview quality is in the hands of the interviewer: the questions asked. Many jurisdictions around the world now allow investigative interviews with child witnesses to be played in court as the witness’s evidence-in-chief, making the quality of interview questioning central to how judges and juries perceive the reliability of children’s evidence. Ensuring that investigative interviews are conducted using best practice methods gives each child’s evidence the greatest chance of positively impacting prosecution and conviction rates for child abuse offences.

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Investigative Interviewing: Research and Practice
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© 2012 iIIRG. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
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Forensic Psychology
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Powell, M; Steinberg, R, Overcoming barriers to best practice interviewing, Investigative Interviewing: Research and Practice, 2012, 4 (1), pp. 5-9
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