Coping with medical training demands: Thinking of dropping out, or in it for the long haul

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Accepted Manuscript (AM)

Author(s)
Rogers, Mary E
Creed, Peter A
Searle, Judy
Nicholls, Serena L
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2016
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Medical trainees are at risk of psychological distress due to training workload demands. Dropping out of medicine has hidden and real costs to both the public and the individual. Using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, this study assessed differences in stress and coping strategies between those serious and not serious about dropping out of medicine. A total of 854 medical students and junior doctors completed a web-based survey assessing training stress, problemsolving coping, seeking support coping, avoidance coping, and risky behaviour coping. Those serious about dropping out of medicine were high on training stress, avoidance coping, and risky behaviour coping. Specifically, males were high on risky behaviour coping, and doctors were high on avoidance coping.Reasons for contemplating dropping out of medicine were professional fit, workload, work-life balance, and the medical education training system. Identification of at-risk groups can inform efforts to design and deliver wellness interventions for medical trainees.

Journal Title

Studies in Higher Education

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume
Issue
Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2015 Taylor & Francis (Routledge). This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Studies in Higher Education on 22 Jan 2015, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03075079.2014.999318

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Education systems

Higher education

Specialist studies in education

Organisational behaviour

Industrial and organisational psychology (incl. human factors)

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections