Essentiality of Trace Element Micronutrition in Human Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version

Version of Record (VoR)

Author(s)
Spencer, Briohny
Vanderlelie, Jessica
Perkins, Anthony
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2015
Size
File type(s)
Location
Abstract

The physiological challenges and metabolic demands of pregnancy increase maternal nutritional requirements for macro and micronutrients, critical for the establishment and maintenance of a healthy pregnancy. Trace elements are essential for a variety of cellular processes, and their deficiency has been linked to complications of pregnancy such as preeclampsia, preterm delivery and small for gestational age babies. Growing evidence suggests that populations of both developing and developed nations may be at risk of sub-optimal micronutrient intakes and that micronutrient supplementation may provide a cost-effective and safe strategy to improve pregnancy outcomes. This review evaluates the importance of essential trace element micronutrition in pregnancy and discusses the benefits of supplementation on maternal outcomes and fetal development. The potential importance of key essential trace elements; magnesium, copper, zinc, calcium, iodine, manganese, selenium and iron are discussed and their importance in pregnancy considered.

Journal Title

Journal of Pregnancy and Child Health

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

2

Issue

3

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2015 Spencer BH, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Public Nutrition Intervention

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections