The skin awareness study: promoting thorough skin self-examination for skin cancer among men 50 years or older

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
File version
Author(s)
Janda, M
Baade, PD
Youl, PH
Aitken, JF
Whiteman, DC
Gordon, L
Neale, RE
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2010
Size

270401 bytes

File type(s)

application/pdf

Location
License
Abstract

Background Incidence and mortality from skin cancers including melanoma are highest among men 50 years or older. Thorough skin self-examination may be beneficial to improve skin cancer outcomes. Objectives To develop and conduct a randomized-controlled trial of a video-based intervention to improve skin self-examination behavior among men 50 years or older. Methods Pilot work ascertained appropriate targeting of the 12-minute intervention video towards men 50 years or older. Overall, 968 men were recruited and 929 completed baseline telephone assessment. Baseline analysis assessed randomization balance and demographic, skin cancer risk and attitudinal factors associated with conducting a whole-body skin self-examination or receiving a whole-body clinical skin examination by a doctor during the past 12 months. Results Randomization resulted in well-balanced intervention and control groups. Overall 13% of men reported conducting a thorough skin self-examination using a mirror or the help of another person to check difficult to see areas, while 39% reported having received a whole-body skin examination by a doctor within the past 12 months. Confidence in finding time for and receiving advice or instructions by a doctor to perform a skin self-examination were among the factors associated with thorough skin self-examination at baseline. Conclusions Men 50 years or older can successfully be recruited to a video-based intervention trial with the aim to reduce their burden through skin cancer. Randomization by computer generated randomization list resulted in good balance between control and intervention group and baseline analysis determined factors associated with skin cancer early detection behavior.

Journal Title

Contemporary Clinical Trials

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

31

Issue

1

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2010 Elsevier Inc. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Biomedical and clinical sciences

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections