Large Scale Map or the A-Z? The Place of Self-help Services in Legal Aid

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Giddings, J
Robertson, M
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)

Philip A. Thomas

Date
2003
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

Australian legal aid agencies are increasing their reliance on self-help legal services as part of their service delivery mix. Self-help legal services seek to harness the productive capacity of consumers,enabling wider distribution of legal aid services. The move to self-help services as an alternative to traditional legal service delivery appears to have gained momentum in advance of any sound understandings of what legal consumers, and legal aid consumers in particular, are capable of. In addition to the cost benefits of providing self-help services rather than traditional legal services, these services have been promoted on the basis of their capacity to empower users to address their own legal matters. Examples of the misuse by government agencies of notions of empowerment emphasize the importance of ensuring the usefulness of self-help legal services.

Journal Title

Journal of Law and Society

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

30

Issue

1

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
DOI
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement

© 2003 Blackwell Publishing. The definitive version is available at [www.blackwell-synergy.com.]

Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Criminology

Sociology

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections