Understanding our patients better will lead to better recognition of delirium: An opinion piece

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Eeles, Eamonn M
England, Renee
Armstrong, Aurelia
Pinsker, Donna
Pandy, Shaun
Teodorczuk, Andrew
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2018
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Abstract

Delirium is a temporary condition involving a disturbance in attention, cognition and awareness. Typically, it develops over a relatively short time frame and fluctuates in severity. Delirium is preventable in one‐third of cases, and early detection improves outcomes 1. Yet, this common and potentially devastating hospital complication is associated with non‐detection rates as high as 70% 1, 2. Why is this?

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Australasian Journal on Ageing
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37
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4
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Biomedical and clinical sciences
Clinical sciences
Human society
Psychology
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Gerontology
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Eeles, EM; England, R; Armstrong, A; Pinsker, D; Pandy, S; Teodorczuk, A, Understanding our patients better will lead to better recognition of delirium: An opinion piece, Australasian Journal on Ageing, 2018, 37 (4), pp. 241-242
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