Do people with shortened dental arches have worse oral health‐related quality of life than those with more natural teeth? A population‐based study

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Tan, Haiping
Peres, Karen G.
Peres, Marco Aurélio
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2015
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Objective: To test whether people with shortened dental arches (SDA) have impaired oral health-related quality of life than those with more natural teeth. Method: We analysed data from the 2004–2006 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health (including telephone interview, oral epidemiological examinations and mailed questionnaire). Participants aged ≥15 years and with intact anterior teeth were eligible in this study. We used multivariable negative binomial regression analyses to test the association of SDA, according to two alternative definition (1. having intact teeth and 3-5 natural occlusal units; 2. having intact anterior teeth and four natural occlusal units), with OHIP-14 severity and extent, adjusting for potential confounders, including demographic variables (age and sex), socioeconomic variables (income and education), behaviour characteristics (time since last visit, reason for the last dental visit, difficult in paying $100 dental bill and dental insurance possession), and dental outcomes (coronal and root caries, and periodontal disease). Result: We analysed on 2,750 dentate participants that were eligible for the study. When SDA was classified as intact anterior teeth, four occlusal units and no dental prosthesis, no statistical difference in OHIP-14 severity or extent was identified compared with those with intact anterior teeth, over four occlusal units and no dental prosthesis. Participants who presented intact anterior teeth, 3-5 occlusal units and no prosthesis showed 50% higher rates of OHIP-14 severity than those with intact anterior teeth, over five occlusal units and no prosthesis while their OHIP-14 extent was similar to that of the reference group. Conclusion: SDA is not associated with negative impacts on quality of life, according to both OHIP-14 severity and extent, when SDA is defined as four occlusal units and no dental prosthesis. When SDA is defined as 3-5 occlusal units and no dental prosthesis, it is only associated with OHIP-14 severity, but not OHIP-14 extent.

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Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology

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43

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1

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Dentistry

Dentistry not elsewhere classified

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