Advanced Redox Materials for Solar Fuel Production via Two-step Thermochemical Cycles

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Zhao, HuiJun

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Yang, Huagui

Wang, Yun

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Date
2017
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Abstract

The transition of primary energy supply from fossil fuels to renewable and clean energy sources has become critical in the wake of concerns over ever increasing global energy demand and the urgent need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. One promising and effective way of minimising carbon emissions is to convert abundant solar energy into storable and transportable fuels, e.g. solar fuels. In this context, solar-driven thermochemical water splitting represents an alternative clean and sustainable route to produce hydrogen (H2) from water. In a typical thermochemical solar energy conversion process, thermal reduction and water dissociation take place in separate steps. A metal oxide based catalyst is used to decrease the required high processing temperature and prevent mixing of the O2 and H2 produced by the process. The overall performance and energy conversion efficiency of a thermochemical water splitting cell is largely dependent on the inherent catalytic characteristics of the catalysts.

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Thesis (PhD Doctorate)

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Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

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Griffith School of Environment

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The author owns the copyright in this thesis, unless stated otherwise.

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Subject

Fossil fuels

Carbon dioxide emissions

Metal oxide based catalyst

Redox materials

Solar fuel production

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