The impact of fossils on the Evolutionary Distinctiveness and conservation status of the Australian lungfish

No Thumbnail Available
File version
Author(s)
Cavin, Lionel
Kemp, Anne
Griffith University Author(s)
Primary Supervisor
Other Supervisors
Editor(s)
Date
2011
Size
File type(s)
Location
License
Abstract

The recognition of phylogenetic information for evaluating conservation priorities has stressed the importance of basal taxa. The ''Evolutionary Distinctiveness'' index (ED) is a species-specific index that includes branch length expressed as an absolute value measured in millions of years that can be applied to a single terminal taxon in a phylogeny. The ED depends on the tree pattern, i.e. of a cladogram included into a time-scale. When calculated for the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), a threatened dipnoan that occurs naturally only in southeast Queensland, the ED index shows variable value according to the chosen tree. On the basis of a recently proposed phylogeny including a new fossil find from the Early Cretaceous of Thailand, the ED value reaches the highest value for piscine sarcopterygians, and for all vertebrates, and thus reinforces the ''originality'' of this fish. This example points out the importance of fossils in the resolution of phylogenies and beyond, in the calculation of indexes supporting conservation decisions.

Journal Title

Biological Conservation

Conference Title
Book Title
Edition
Volume

144

Issue

12

Thesis Type
Degree Program
School
Publisher link
Patent number
Funder(s)
Grant identifier(s)
Rights Statement
Rights Statement
Item Access Status
Note
Access the data
Related item(s)
Subject

Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified

Environmental Sciences

Biological Sciences

Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences

Persistent link to this record
Citation
Collections