Artist-Teacher Practitioner research with Indigenous Australian communities on sites of conflict and contestation

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Nalder, Glenda
Ganis, Venus
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Dr. Penny Collette
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2009
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Abstract

Australia's coastline, flora and fauna have been the object of fascination for, and the subject of, representation by European cartographers, botanists and artists since the Seventeenth Century. To Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, the Earth is mother, and survival contingent upon intimate knowledge of, and reverence for, the lands, waters and skies, mapped and recorded through symbol, story, dance and song. While many non-Indigenous artists working in the landscape adopt an approach that is culturally and historically aware, the formalisation of art-practice as research within academic institutions requires artists to address ethical concerns in the conduct of their research. This paper proposes a methodology and strategies to ensure the preservation of First Peoples' cultural authority in knowledge sharing.

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Journal of Art Education Australia
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© 2009 Art Education Australia. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
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Subject
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Studies
Curriculum and Pedagogy
Art Theory and Criticism
Visual Arts and Crafts
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